Protect Yourself – Practice Safe Internet Banking: Part I

The first of two posts on safe internet banking.

As use of the Internet continues to expand, more banks, credit unions, and thrifts are using the Web to offer products and services or otherwise enhance communications with consumers. It’s very important, however, for consumers to check and confirm that any company they might do their banking with is legitimate and that their deposits are insured.

For good advice on how to protect yourself, visit the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) at Practice Safe Internet Banking . It’s the that FDIC provides insurance for depositors at banks and thrifts.

The National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) provides similar insurance for depositors at credit unions, such as Tri-Town Teachers FCU. Visit mycreditunion.gov for more information about credit unions.

In today’s post we will cover this critical advice from the FDIC web site:

  • Confirm that an online bank is legitimate and that your deposits are insured

In our next post we will cover other important points from that web site:

  • Keep your personal information private and secure

  • Understand your rights as a consumer

  • Learn where to go for more assistance from banking regulator

Tips for Safe Banking Over the Internet:

The Internet offers the potential for safe, convenient new ways to shop for financial services and conduct banking business, any day, any time. However, safe banking online involves making good choices – decisions that will help you avoid costly surprises or even scams.

 

Confirm that an Online Bank Is Legitimate and that Your Deposits Are Insured

Whether you are selecting a traditional bank or an online bank that has no physical offices, it’s wise to make sure that it is legitimate and that your deposits are federally insured. Here are tips specifically designed for consumers considering banking over the Internet.

Read key information about the bank posted on its Web site.

Most bank Web sites have an “About Us” section or something similar that describes the institution. You may find a brief history of the bank, the official name and address of the bank’s headquarters, and information about its insurance coverage from the FDIC.

Protect yourself from fraudulent Web sites.

For example, watch out for copycat Web sites that deliberately use a name or Web address very similar to, but not the same as, that of a real financial institution. The intent is to lure you into clicking onto their Web site and giving your personal information, such as your account number and password. Always check to see that you have typed the correct Web site address for your bank before conducting a transaction.

Verify the bank’s insurance status.

To verify a bank’s insurance status, look for the familiar FDIC logo or the words “Member FDIC” or “FDIC Insured” on the Web site.

signFDIC

(editor’s note: a similar notice should be visible on credit union web sites and in branch offices)

Also, you should check the FDIC’s online database of FDIC-insured institutions. You can search for an institution by going to Bank Find (formerly “Is My Bank Insured?”). Search by name, city, state or zip code of the bank, and click the “Find” button. A positive match will display the official name of the bank, the date it became insured, its insurance certificate number, the main office location for the bank (and branches), its primary government regulator, and other links to detailed information about the bank. If your bank does not appear on this list, contact the FDIC.

Some bank Web sites provide links directly to the FDIC’s Web site to assist you in identifying or verifying the FDIC insurance protection of their deposits.

Also remember that not all banks operating on the Internet are insured by the FDIC. Many banks that are not FDIC-insured are chartered overseas. If you choose to use a bank chartered overseas, it is important for you to know that the FDIC may not insure your deposits. Check with your bank or the FDIC if you are not certain.

For insurance purposes, be aware that a bank may use different names for its online and traditional services; this does not mean you are dealing with separate banks.

Don’t worry about your deposit insurance coverage if you or your family have less than $250,000 in all your accounts combined at the same FDIC-insured bank. But if your accounts total $250,000 or more, find out if they’re within the insurance limit. Contact your bank for more information.

For additional assistance from the FDIC about the legitimacy of an institution or the insurance of your deposits, call the FDIC’s Division of Compliance and Consumer Affairs toll-free at 1-877-275-3342 or send an e-mail via the FDIC’s online Customer Assistance page.

The FDIC’s Web site also has an interactive service called EDIE (Electronic Deposit Insurance Estimator) that can help you determine the amount of your insurance coverage. Or, you can read the online deposit insurance brochure “Your Insured Deposits.”

It’s important to note that only deposits offered by FDIC-insured institutions are protected by the FDIC. Nondeposit investment and insurance products, such as mutual funds, stocks, annuities and life insurance policies that may be sold through Web sites or at the bank itself, are not FDIC-insured, are not guaranteed by the bank, and may lose value.

Was This Helpful?

We hope this post helpful. Let us know, leave a comment. Tell us what topics would most help you. We’d love to hear from you.

Thank you for reading the Tri-Town Apple.

 

One thought on “Protect Yourself – Practice Safe Internet Banking: Part I

  1. Pingback: Protect Yourself – Practice Safe Internet Banking: Part II |

Comments are closed.