Home Equity Line of Credit

This is the second of four planned posts on the subject of home equity loans.

We’re using a four part article published by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) on their Consumer Information website. You can and should visit this site, not only to view this article but to see the other topics of information that pertain to many of us. Click here to visit.

Four part Series:

Home Equity Loans and Credit Lines – Introduction

If you’re thinking about making some home improvements or looking at ways to pay for your child’s college education, you may be thinking about tapping into your home’s equity — the difference between what your home could sell for and what you owe on the mortgage — as a way to cover the costs.

Loan or Line of Credit

Home equity financing can be set up as a loan or a line of credit. With a home equity loan, the lender advances you the total loan amount upfront, while a home equity credit line provides a source of funds that you can draw on as needed.

Shop and Compare

When considering a home equity loan or credit line, shop around and compare loan plans offered by banks, savings and loans, credit unions, and mortgage companies. Shopping can help you get a better deal.

Stay Within Your Budget

Remember that your home secures the amount that you borrow through a home equity loan or line of credit. If you don’t pay your debt, the lender may be able to force you to sell your home to satisfy the debt.

Home Equity Line of Credit

A home equity line of credit — also known as a HELOC — is a revolving line of credit, much like a credit card. You can borrow as much as you need, any time you need it, by writing a check or using a credit card connected to the account. You may not exceed your credit limit. Because a HELOC is a line of credit, you make payments only on the amount you actually borrow, not the full amount available. HELOCs also may give you certain tax advantages unavailable with some kinds of loans. Talk to an accountant or tax adviser for details.

Like home equity loans, HELOCs require you to use your home as collateral for the loan. This may put your home at risk if your payment is late or you can’t make your payment at all. Loans with a large balloon payment — a lump sum usually due at the end of a loan — may lead you to borrow more money to pay off this debt, or they may put your home in jeopardy if you can’t qualify for refinancing. And, if you sell your home, most plans require you to pay off your credit line at the same time.

HELOC FAQs  Continue reading

Home Equity Loans

This is the first of four planned posts on the subject of home equity loans.

We’re using a four part article published by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) on their Consumer Information website. You can and should visit this site, not only to view this article but to see the other topics of information that pertain to many of us. Click here to visit.

Four part Series:

Home Equity Loans and Credit Lines – Introduction

If you’re thinking about making some home improvements or looking at ways to pay for your child’s college education, you may be thinking about tapping into your home’s equity — the difference between what your home could sell for and what you owe on the mortgage — as a way to cover the costs.

Loan or Line of Credit

Home equity financing can be set up as a loan or a line of credit. With a home equity loan, the lender advances you the total loan amount upfront, while a home equity credit line provides a source of funds that you can draw on as needed.

Shop and Compare

When considering a home equity loan or credit line, shop around and compare loan plans offered by banks, savings and loans, credit unions, and mortgage companies. Shopping can help you get a better deal.

Stay Within Your Budget

Remember that your home secures the amount that you borrow through a home equity loan or line of credit. If you don’t pay your debt, the lender may be able to force you to sell your home to satisfy the debt.

Home Equity Loans

A home equity loan is a loan for a fixed amount of money that is secured by your home. You repay the loan with equal monthly payments over a fixed term, just like your original mortgage. If you don’t repay the loan as agreed, your lender can foreclose on your home. Continue reading